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New Scientist

Jun 04 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Make do and mend • The fashion world must change its environmentally destructive ways

New Scientist

Nuclear waste in spotlight • Mini nuclear reactors may create more radioactive waste for a given amount of power than conventional reactors, reports Adam Vaughan

First genome of Pompeii resident • Human remains from towns destroyed by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius reveal the genetics of ancient Romans and the resilience of bone proteins, reports Colin Barras

Beware! Planet thieves are operating across the universe

Self-replicating artificial cells move a step nearer

3D-printed tourniquets could help save lives

‘Zombie’ pulsar is active member of star graveyard

Spaceport America, New Mexico • Boldly going where no one has gone before SpinLaunch has an audacious plan to launch satellites with a giant centrifuge, and it might change the future of space flight, reports Leah Crane

Artificial intelligence • Will text-to-speech AIs put illustrators out of a job? Google’s Imagen AI produces high-quality images from a text prompt, but is it ready to replace humans, asks Alex Wilkins

Immunotherapy for brain cancer can be made more effective

Dash of tomato colouring makes better solar panels

UK talent visa blocks graduates from African universities

Driverless cars could force other road users to drive more efficiently

NASA backs rainbow-coloured solar sail project

Maps show ecological toll of Japan’s switch to farming

Bricks of moon or Mars dust are sturdy enough for buildings

Gene therapy on the rise • Having fallen out of favour in the 2000s, gene therapy is now helping children who would otherwise have died at a young age, reports Alice Klein

Firearm suicides are increasing in the US, despite declining globally

Quantum computer does any calculation without errors

Romans may have set rare seals on the path to peril

Stellar puzzle settled by an unlikely source

Lifestyle can counter genetic dementia risk

Really brief

Graphene made from old bumpers

‘Teleportation’ achieved in miniature quantum network

Micro machine can climb through body

Lessons from space • There is much we can learn from space exploration to help secure a more sustainable food system on Earth, argues Angelo Vermeulen

My botanical life • Time to smell the roses While botanical gardens have evolved from their medicinal roots in 16th-century Italy, their plants can still bring peace and joy today, says Beronda L. Montgomery

In the details

Editor’s pick

Daleks, K9 and the TARDIS • A mind-expanding new exhibition in Liverpool, UK, sets out to explore how science has influenced the making of Doctor Who, discovers Clare Wilson

Rites of passage • From animal death rites to gang initiations, rituals are found everywhere. This riveting book explores why, finds Simon Ings

Don’t miss

On the right track • The physics in this meandering but compelling novel adds flavour rather than substance, with the focus more on mental health, finds Anna Demming

Meet the dinosaurs of south London

CAN FASHION REALLY GO GREEN? • Our love of cheap and cheerful clothes is hugely damaging to the environment. What does more sustainable fashion look like, and what will it...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Jun 04 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: June 2, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Make do and mend • The fashion world must change its environmentally destructive ways

New Scientist

Nuclear waste in spotlight • Mini nuclear reactors may create more radioactive waste for a given amount of power than conventional reactors, reports Adam Vaughan

First genome of Pompeii resident • Human remains from towns destroyed by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius reveal the genetics of ancient Romans and the resilience of bone proteins, reports Colin Barras

Beware! Planet thieves are operating across the universe

Self-replicating artificial cells move a step nearer

3D-printed tourniquets could help save lives

‘Zombie’ pulsar is active member of star graveyard

Spaceport America, New Mexico • Boldly going where no one has gone before SpinLaunch has an audacious plan to launch satellites with a giant centrifuge, and it might change the future of space flight, reports Leah Crane

Artificial intelligence • Will text-to-speech AIs put illustrators out of a job? Google’s Imagen AI produces high-quality images from a text prompt, but is it ready to replace humans, asks Alex Wilkins

Immunotherapy for brain cancer can be made more effective

Dash of tomato colouring makes better solar panels

UK talent visa blocks graduates from African universities

Driverless cars could force other road users to drive more efficiently

NASA backs rainbow-coloured solar sail project

Maps show ecological toll of Japan’s switch to farming

Bricks of moon or Mars dust are sturdy enough for buildings

Gene therapy on the rise • Having fallen out of favour in the 2000s, gene therapy is now helping children who would otherwise have died at a young age, reports Alice Klein

Firearm suicides are increasing in the US, despite declining globally

Quantum computer does any calculation without errors

Romans may have set rare seals on the path to peril

Stellar puzzle settled by an unlikely source

Lifestyle can counter genetic dementia risk

Really brief

Graphene made from old bumpers

‘Teleportation’ achieved in miniature quantum network

Micro machine can climb through body

Lessons from space • There is much we can learn from space exploration to help secure a more sustainable food system on Earth, argues Angelo Vermeulen

My botanical life • Time to smell the roses While botanical gardens have evolved from their medicinal roots in 16th-century Italy, their plants can still bring peace and joy today, says Beronda L. Montgomery

In the details

Editor’s pick

Daleks, K9 and the TARDIS • A mind-expanding new exhibition in Liverpool, UK, sets out to explore how science has influenced the making of Doctor Who, discovers Clare Wilson

Rites of passage • From animal death rites to gang initiations, rituals are found everywhere. This riveting book explores why, finds Simon Ings

Don’t miss

On the right track • The physics in this meandering but compelling novel adds flavour rather than substance, with the focus more on mental health, finds Anna Demming

Meet the dinosaurs of south London

CAN FASHION REALLY GO GREEN? • Our love of cheap and cheerful clothes is hugely damaging to the environment. What does more sustainable fashion look like, and what will it...


Expand title description text